The Best 60 Degree Wedges For 2019

When a golf ball reaches with 100 yards of the greens and the flagstaff, you are in prime wedge territory. This is the sort range at which wedges truly bring something special to your game. They are after all, specialized irons capable of performing very specific functions.

Wedges can be divided in to four classes based on progressive loft angles: the Pitching Wedge (44-48 degrees), the Gap Wedge (49-53), the Sand Wedge (54-58) and finally, the focus of this review, the Lob Wedge (60-64). A 60 degree wedge is the most common lob wedge variant.

You can get them in higher lofts, but 60 is usually a good place to start. These are some of the best 60 degree wedges in the business right now:

Our Best 60 Degree Wedges

A Lob Wedge: What Does It Do?

This is not one of those clubs you would commonly find in a standard golf club set. If you want one, you have to get it separately just like a driver. But in terms of the type of shot it generates, a lob wedge is at the other end of the spectrum when compared to a driver (or a fairway wood).

With a driver you get a fast and flat shot that covers hundreds of yards in the air and then some on the ground as well.

With a 60 degree lob wedge, the ball will travel high in the air and land on the ground with minimal bounce or roll. Lobs from 50 yards away onto the the green, and chip shots from the green to the flagstick, that is what a lob wedge delivers with aplomb.

Why Keep a 60 Degree Wedge in Your Set?

Make no mistake, a 60 degree lob wedge is a specialist club useful for a specific purpose: get the ball high in the air, cover a maximum of 50-60 yards and land softly on the green. Is it a one trick pony?

Not really, but compared to a hybrid or a PW, it certainly has its limitations in terms of versatility. But, and this a very big but, a Lob Wedge comes into play a stage when precision and accuracy wins over distance and power.

It can get you within an easy putting distance to the hole, while any avoiding nasty bunkers and rough that may lie in your approach.

The high arching shot produced by a lob wedge can even help to get over and across treeline if they are obstructing your path to the green. And it is a great option when you are in real deep rough or in a sand bank in a bad way.

When to Use a Lob Wedge?

Any time you want the ball to rise sharply in the air and land softly without much roll, you pretty much use a lob wedge. A PW or SW will also get the job done, but a lob wedge will do it better.

And if you are in real deep rough within 50-60 yards of the green, you definitely need a 60 degree wedge to get you out of trouble. The use of a specialized club like the lob wedge depends a lot on the quality of your lie.

The worse your lie, and the shorter the distance to the cup, the better off you are with a lob wedge, If you have a tree or a water hazard or sand between you and the green, you use this club. If the hazard is at an elevation above your lie, you definitely use this wedge.

They are also better suited for shorter pitches with less roll than your pitching wedge or the sand wedge. But one common mistake a lot of golfers make is to use a lob wedge for a short high pitch, where a chip shot would have been more effective.

Not that these wedges cant get the job done, but in some lies, a chip shot with an 8 or 9 iron is better than pitching with lob wedges.

Golf is all about optimizing your chances with the right equipment at the right time. When the time and lie calls for elevated shots over shorter yardage, the lob wedge is your best friend. You might have to sacrifice another club, probably a long iron, to include a lob wedge in your game bag.

But since the short game has more implications on your final score than distance game, it is not exactly a very painful decision to make.

golfer hitting a sand bunker shot

60 Degree Wedge Buying Guide: The Art of the Bounce

Once you know which particular loft angle you want for your wedge, the most pressing question is about the bounce. The bounce of a wedge is the design of the sole of the club…

It determines how well your wedge avoids getting stuck in the turf or sand during the swing.

Wedges are usually used on poor surfaces like deep roughs and sand. When you swing your wedge, you want the club to hit clean through and not dig in. Bounce is what determines how well your wedge functions in this department.

If your club has too little bounce, you might end up with shots where the clubhead comes in contact with the ground before striking the ball, resulting in a “fat shot”. You don’t want that to happen unless you are in a sand bunker.

They usually result in weak shots that don’t carry very far. If you have too much bounce on your club, you end up with the opposite, a “thin shot”. You hit the ball with the lower portion of your wedge’s clubface, slicing the ball into the distance.

Ideal bounce of a wedge for a golfer depends on several factors:

The Swing

if you habitually swing your wedges steeply, i.e., if your angle of attack is on the steeper side, you need a wedge with higher bounce. If If you strike the ball in a sweeping motion with a shallow angle of attack, get a club with less bounce.

The Course Conditions

Firmer the surface, go for lower bounce angles (fairways and tight lies for instance). For relatively softer/looser conditions (sand or extra rough), get a club with high bounce.

How deeply you should concern yourself with the bounce angle depends entirely on your approach to golf. I you are in it as a casual or occasional golfer, you can get by without bothering about the bounce. But if you really care about your handicap and game improvement, yeah, you should keep on top of it.

Best 60 Degree Wedges Reviewed

Titleist Vokey SM6 Wedge

The Vokey is a wildly popular series of clubs from Titleist. The SM6 version of wedges come in a range of lofts and 4 different grind options for different bounce angles. The 60 degree wedge comes sole grinds designated as L (low bounce), M and S (medium bounce) and K (high bounce).

The higher the bounce the better, IF and only if your swing canhandle it. Keep that in mind when trying to pick the sole grind option. The wedge also comes in three finishes: steel, chrome and black. The spin milled grooves in the 60 wedge offers more spin and control for those precise shots into the green.

PROS

  • Best in class control, the grooves help you place precise shots with ease
  • Works like a charm in the rough and especially in the sands Top notch finish, and the simple classy design stands out from the rest
  • Numerous options in bounce angle, sole grind and finish

CONS

  • Not too forgiving, not suitable for high handicappers

Mizuno S5 Wedge

This forged carbon steel wedge from Mizuno has a slightly larger clubhead and should be more forgiving for mid to high handicappers. Whatever its drawbacks may or may not be, you certainly cannot fault the S5 in the looks department.

The sapphire blue finish looks especially glorious and should help one stand out on a course any day of the year. The 60 degree wedge come in two bounce options, a lower 6 degree version and one with a high 10 degree bounce.

PROS

  • Easy to work and play with, you can execute a wide variety of pitches, flops, chips and bumps with ease
  • Great control over the distance of shots, gives you confidence to make aggressive shots
  • The big face and head inspires confidence in high handicappers

CONS

  • Not the best in the business when it comes to generating spin, so control suffers slightly
  • The finish wouldn’t last too long with wear Only two bounce options

Cobra King Wedge

These wedges have always had a distinctive look and feel over the years. The big rounded head makes this look a winning proposition for golfers of all skill levels (except maybe the pros of course!).

The milled grooves on the 60 degree wedge has are narrower, and the face has been machined into a rough surface to improve spin and distance control.

There are 3 sole grind options on offer for the 60 degree wedge: Classic (high bounce, 11), Versatile (medium, 8) and WideLow (4).

PROS

  • Just the right amount of forgiveness to attract a wide range of players
  • The improved grooves offer better spin and control, the consistency is amazing especially in higher lofts like 60
  • Multiple sole grind options to suit every kind of golfer

CONS

  • Only available in chrome finish
  • The feel of the wedge is a bit unique, may not suit all players

Nike Engage Wedges

The grinds and lofts on this series was fashioned with inputs from golfing greats like Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy. They stand out from the rest of the pack with some unique sole grind variations as well as geometric patterns on the back of the clubface.

There is a lot of tech that has gone into these wedges. The 60 degree lob wedge has a dual sole grind, which is Nike’s interpretation of the extreme tour sole grind used by many manufacturers.

Basically, you can alternate between lofted lobs and soft chips around the green by just opening and closing face of the club during your swing.

PROS

  • Lots of fancy looking tech on display
  • The finish is raw steel, and it rusts fast, increasing spin as well looks
  • Dual soles are great for tight lies

CONS

  • The rusting is fine from a performance point of view, but it is a bit on the faster side
  • The dual soles offer nothing radically different from the tour grinds

Conclusion

The current trend in wedge design and marketing firmly headed in the direction of catering to a wide audience with progressive lofts and multiple choices in bounce angles and sole grinds. To know exactly which configuration suits you best, talk to a clubfitter or your local golf expert.

From our shortlist, the wedge that stands out from the rest for us is the Vokey SM6 from Titleist. If you are mid level handicapper, this is the best 60 degree wedge for you with all the different configuration options.

For higher handicappers, the Mizuno S5 offers a very forgiving game

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